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Monday, January 31, 2011

The Podium Shopping Centre Bath

The Podium Shopping Centre in Bath lies in the centre of Georgian Bath. The Podium features a range of shops including a Waitrose supermarket. The Podium features a number of cafes and restaurants as well. The Bath Central Library is also located at The Podium.


The Podium Shopping Centre Bath

The Podium Shopping Centre Bath is located on Northgate Street in Bath. Visitors to The Podium may also want to visit nearby Roman Baths, Bath Abbey, the Assembly Rooms, Prior Park, or the East Asian Museum all easy to access on a half-day or full-day tour of this historic spa town.

The Podium Shopping Centre
Northgate Street, Bath
BA1 5AL
Tel: 01225 444678

The Podium Shopping Centre Bath Map

Hotel accommodation in Bath UK

© Britain-Visitor.com

Sunday, January 30, 2011

St Cyriac's Parish Church Lacock

St Cyriac's Parish Church Lacock was built around 1480 AD, but the site has been used as a church since at least Norman and possibly even Saxon times. At the time of its building, Lacock was a prosperous wool town. The name of St Cyriac comes from a 3 year old child martyred in Cilicia in 303 AD. St Cyriac's was restored in 1861 by the architect Arthur Blomfield.


St Cyriac's Parish Church Lacock
The nave (see below) of St Cyriac's Parish Church Lacock was rebuilt in 1861 and features a fine wagon roof. The chancel at the far end of the nave was rebuilt in 1771 and remodeled in 1902 and is dedicated to William Henry Fox Talbot of Lacock Abbey.

St Cyriac's Parish Church Lacock
St Cyriac's Parish Church Lacock is located on Church Street in Lacock. Visitors to St Cyriac's may also want to visit nearby Lacock Abbey, Great Chalfield Manor, or The Courts Garden.

21 Church Street
Lacock, Wiltshire
SN15 2LB

St Cyriac's Parish Church Lacock Map

© Britain-Visitor.com

Saturday, January 29, 2011

Tomb of Robert 'Duke of Normandy'

Robert Curthose 'Duke of Normandy' was the eldest son of William the Conqueror and Matilda of Flanders. His reign as duke which began in 1087, upon William the Conqueror's death, was marked by conflict with his brothers in England.

Robert went on the first crusade in 1096, and when he returned, invaded England to claim the throne held by his brother Henry. Henry defeated Robert in the Battle of Tinchebray in Normandy, France in 1106, and Robert was subsequently imprisoned in Devizes Castle and Cardiff Castle until his death in 1134. Rosemary Sutcliff's 1960 historical novel Knight's Fee depicts these events.

Tomb of Robert 'Duke of Normandy'

Robert 'Duke of Normandy' was buried in the Abbey Church of St Peter (which became Gloucester Cathedral). Although the exact location of the tomb remains a mystery, his effigy carved in bog oak (see above) lies on a mortuary chest in the cathedral.

Tomb of Robert 'Duke of Normandy'

The tomb of Robert 'Duke of Normandy' lies in Gloucester Cathedral. Gloucester Cathedral is located on College Green in central Gloucester. Visitors to Gloucester Cathedral may also want to visit nearby Snowshill Manor or Chedworth Roman Villa.

Gloucester Cathedral
12 College Green
Gloucester
GL1 2LX
Tel: 01452 528095

Gloucester Cathedral Map

© Britain-Visitor.com

Friday, January 28, 2011

No 7 The Circus Bath

The Circus in Bath is a leading example of Georgian architecture. Designed by John Wood the Elder and completed by his son, John Wood the Younger, construction began in 1754 and ended in 1768. Inspired by the Colosseum in Rome, The Circus was originally called 'King's Circus'.

No 7 The Circus Bath
Although most of the houses in The Circus have been divided into flats, some houses like No 7 (see below) remain. In March 2009, No 7 The Circus sold for £3.5 million. The actor Nicolas Cage is said to have paid £4 million for the house in 2007.

No 7 The Circus Bath
The Circus is located in the centre of Bath. Visitors to The Circus may also want to visit other Bath locations including the Roman Baths, Bath Abbey,  the Assembly Rooms, Prior Park, or the East Asian Museum.

Map of The Circus Bath

© Britain-Visitor.com

Thursday, January 27, 2011

Buses From Exeter St. David's Station

Exeter St David's Station is a hub for buses to other destinations from Exeter with many of the buses that start at Exeter Bus Station calling at Exeter St. David's Station.



There are bus services to Monkerton and Duryard Hall at Exeter University, Sowton (H1), Exeter High Street (H2) and (M), Barnstaple (155) & (315), Bude (X9) & (X90), Chulmleigh (377), Clyst Honiton (379),
Crediton (50), Great Torrington (51), Cowleymoor (55 & 55A), Tiverton (355), (55B) & (55C), Exmouth (56) & (56A), Colaton Raleigh (57C), Morchard Bishop (369), Salcombe (X64), Witheridge (378), Wonford (X).
The 510 bus (pictured above) runs from Exeter via Okehampton to Launceston and Newquay in about 3 hours and 15 minutes.

Exeter St David's Station


Exeter St David's Station
Bonhay Road
Exeter
EX4 4NT
Tel: 08457 000125

© Britain-Visitor.com

Wednesday, January 26, 2011

Southampton Airport Flight Tracker

Track flights arriving and departing Southampton Airport (SOU).



Flight information is provided by FlightStats, and is subject to the FlightStats Terms of Use.

Southampton Airport (SOU) has connecting flights to Alderney, Aberdeen, Durham/Tees Valley, Chambery (winter ski season), Edinburgh, Geneva, Glasgow, Guernsey, Innsbruck (winter only), Inverness, Isle of Man, Jersey Isles of Scilly, Leeds Bradford, Liverpool, Manchester Airport, Newcastle, Stavanger, Stornoway, and Wick.

Overseas destinations in Europe departing from Sothampton Airport include Alicante, Amsterdam, Avignon, Bergerac, Bordeaux, Brest, Brussels, Dublin, Düsseldorf, Faro, Frankfurt, Hanover, La Rochelle, Malaga, Nice, Palma de Mallorca, Paris-CDG and Rennes.

Access

Southampton Airport Parkway, (South Western Main Line from London Waterloo) is the airport's dedicated railway station and trains take just over an hour from Waterloo. There are also regular train services to Bournemouth (36 mins), Dorchester, Poole (50 minutes), Southampton Central Station (8 mins), Winchester (10 mins) and Weymouth. 
Southampton Airport is situated near to the junction between the M3 and M27 motorways.

By bus the Uni-link U1C runs to the University, Southampton city centre and the eastern docks.

Southampton Airport
SO18 2NL
Tel: +44 (0)844 481 7777

Southampton airport was the home airport of the first Spitfire fighter planes.

Hotels and Guesthouses in Southampton (see a listing of places to stay in Southampton).

© Devon Visitor

Tuesday, January 25, 2011

Museum of East Asian Art Bath

Since its opening in 1993, the Museum Of East Asian Art has housed one of the most extensive collections of East Asian art in the UK. The museum's collection of almost 2,000 objects ranges in date from 5000 BC to the present day.

The Museum of East Asian Art houses a fine collection of ceramics, jades, bronzes, etc. from China, Japan, Korea and Southeast Asia. The Museum of East Asian Art is the only museum in Great Britain dedicated solely to the arts and cultures of East and Southeast Asia.

Museum of East Asian Art
Housed in a restored Georgian building (see below), the Museum of East Asian Art celebrates Bath's historical links to China. The trade in Chinese tea and porcelain was of the utmost commercial importance in 18th century England, and Bath ranked second after London for these activities. By the middle of the 18th century, tea drinking had become an important part of the city’s social life. The Armorial Porcelain in the Ceramics Gallery illustrates the important link between China and 18th century Bath.

Museum of East Asian Art
The Museum of East Asian Art is situated just a few metres off The Circus in central Bath. Visitors to the Museum may also want to visit Bath's many other attractions including the Roman Baths, Bath Abbey, the Assembly Rooms, and many others.

The Museum of East Asian Art
12 Bennett Street
Bath
BA1 2QJ
Tel: 01225 464640

Museum of East Asian Art Map

© Britain-Visitor.com

Monday, January 24, 2011

The Wheel of Manchester

The Wheel of Manchester, which was located in Exchange Square, just outside the Arndale Centre, was one of Manchester's top attractions.



The 60m-tall Ferris wheel had 42 capsules affording great views of the city in a 13 minute circle. One capsule was designated as a VIP capsule with optional champagne.

The first wheel on the site was erected in 2004 and the present wheel replaced it in 2007. The wheel moved to Edinburgh in April 2012.

The Wheel of Manchester was close to the Arndale Center, Urbis and Manchester Cathedral.



The Wheel of Manchester
World Tourist Attractions
Exchange Square
Manchester M3 1BD
UK
Map of the Wheel of Manchester
Tel: 0161 831 9918
Hours: Sunday to Thursday 10am-9pm; Friday 10am to midnight; Saturday 10am to midnight
Admission: 7.50 GBP

© Britain-Visitor.com

Sunday, January 23, 2011

Tomb of King Edward II

On 20 December 1327, King Edward II (1284-1327 AD) who had died at Berkeley Castle (in suspicious circumstances) was buried at Gloucester Cathedral. The popular account that Edward II was assassinated by having a red hot poker thrust into his anus is not supported by modern day historians.

A monument (see below) was erected over the tomb of the dead king. The canopy of that monument was carved from local Cotswold Limestone, and the base is faced with Purbeck Marble.

Tomb of King Edward II
For about 70 years after the king's death, the tomb was a site for pilgrimage. Popular devotion and Royal patronage led to funds flowing into the abbey, and these funds made possible the remodelling of the east end of Gloucester Cathedral to be done in the very latest 'Perpendicular' style.

Tomb of King Edward II
The Tomb of King Edward II is located inside Gloucester Cathedral. Gloucester Cathedral is located on College Green in central Gloucester. Visitors to Gloucester Cathedral may also want to visit nearby Snowshill Manor or Chedworth Roman Villa.

Gloucester Cathedral
12 College Green
Gloucester
GL1 2LX
Tel: 01452 528095

Gloucester Cathedral Map

© Britain-Visitor.com

Saturday, January 22, 2011

Canal Street Gay Village

Canal Street, not far from Manchester Piccadilly Station, is the city's Gay Village packed with gay bars, clubs and cafes.



The street runs parallel to the Rochdale Canal and came into its own as an established gay district in the 1990s with the onset of greater tolerance for gay life and businesses, especially in Manchester.

Before the 1990s, gay people and gay meeting places in the area were often subject to police harassment.



Canal Street and its gay life was featured in the successful UK TV series, Queer as Folk, which helped to publicise the area.

Canal Street is the hub of Manchester's Gay Pride Festival to be held on 26-29 August in 2011 and thereafter over the August Bank Holiday, the same long weekend as the Notting Hill Carnival in London. Canal Street is a short walk from Manchester's Chinatown.



Canal Street

© Britain-Visitor.com

Friday, January 21, 2011

Gloucester Cathedral

Gloucester Cathedral (aka The Cathedral Church of St Peter and the Holy and Indivisible Trinity) has been a place of Christian worship for over 1300 years, since Osric, an Anglo-Saxon prince, founded a religious house here in 678-9 AD.

In 1072, King William I appointed Serlo, a monk from Mont St Michel in Normandy to be its Abbot. Serlo built up the wealth of the monastery so that in 1089 he was able to start building the splendid abbey church which the visitor sees today. King Henry III was crowned here in 1216.

Gloucester Cathedral
Gloucester Cathedral showcases all the periods of medieval church architecture, but its two main building phases – Romanesque and Perpendicular, are of the most importance. The nave (see below) was a Romanesque construction probably completed around 1130.


Gloucester Cathedral
The Presbytery of Gloucester Cathedral (see below) features the Great East Window which was the largest window in the world when it was installed and is still the largest stained glass window in England. The window dates from around 1350.

Gloucester Cathedral
The cloisters (see below) at Gloucester Cathedral feature fan-vaulted ceilings which are believed to have been invented here in the 1350s. Gloucester Cathedral has been used as a location for filming the first, second and sixth Harry Potter films.

Gloucester Cathedral

Gloucester Cathedral is located on College Green in central Gloucester. Visitors to Gloucester Cathedral may also want to visit nearby Snowshill Manor or Chedworth Roman Villa.

Gloucester Cathedral
12 College Green
Gloucester
GL1 2LX
Tel: 01452 528095

Gloucester Cathedral Map

© Britain-Visitor.com

Thursday, January 20, 2011

Cabot Circus Bristol

Cabot Circus in Bristol is a shopping centre which features some exciting architecture as seen below. Cabot Circus cost 500 million pounds to build and features a glass roof the size of one and a half football pitches. Visitors to Cabot Circus in Bristol can shop for fashion, homewares, books, music, toys and much more.



Cabot Circus Bristol
Cabot Circus in Bristol encompasses several streets including Broadmead, Brigstowe and George White. Cabot Circus is intersected by Penn Street.

Cabot Circus
Bristol
BS1 3BX
Tel: 0117 952 9360

Cabot Circus Bristol Map

© Britain-Visitor.com

Wednesday, January 19, 2011

ASDA Longwell Green

ASDA Longwell Green is a large scale 'big box' retailer. ASDA Longwell Green sells groceries, the George clothing line, homewares, electronics, and much more.

ASDA Longwell Green offers the convenience of a spacious parking lot and is often open 24 hours. Potential customers should note that the store closes early (4 PM) on Sundays.


ASDA Longwell Green

The opening hours of ASDA Longwell Green are:
Monday opens from 8am
Tuesday 24 hours
Wednesday 24 hours
Thursday 24 hours
Friday 24 hours
Saturday Closes at 10pm
Sunday 10am - 4pm

ASDA Longwell Green is located on Craven Way in Bristol. Customers at ASDA Longwell Green may also want to try shopping at nearby TK Maxx in Brislington.

ASDA
Craven Way
Bristol
BS30 7DY
Tel: 0117 9603947

ASDA Longwell Green Map

© Britain-Visitor.com

Tuesday, January 18, 2011

Manchester Chinatown

Manchester's Chinatown, though nowhere of the scale and vibrancy of London's Chinatown is a pleasant place to stroll, shop and eat authentic Asian food including Thai, Japanese and Singaporean food.

Located south west of Piccadilly Gardens and not far from the Gay Village, Manchester's Chinatown stretches along the parallel George Street, Back George Street and Faulkner Street (where the arch below is located).


Manchester's Chinatown is the second largest in the country after the Chinatown in London's Soho. The area's roots go back to the 1950s when an influx of Chinese immigrants from Hong Kong settled in the area and there became a demand for Chinese restaurants and other businesses servicing the Chinese community.

Sunday mornings are a good time to visit when the Chinese medicine shops and supermarkets have their main trading days.


© Britain-Visitor.com

Monday, January 17, 2011

TK Maxx Brislington

TK Maxx Brislington is one of over 260 TK Maxx stores across the UK, Ireland, Germany and Poland. TK Maxx follows the labels for less concept (aka "off-price" retailing) which was introduced to the UK from the US in 1994. TK Maxx is the only such off-price retailer in Europe. TK Maxx is the 10th largest fashion retailer in the UK. Besides clothing, TK Maxx sells accessories, luggage, toys and homewares.


TK Maxx Bristol

The TK Maxx outlet seen above is one of two to be found near Bristol. The Brislington store is located on Bath Road in Brislington.

Unit 1, Brislington Retail Park
Bath Road, Brislington
BS4 5NG
Tel: 0117 9713661

TK Maxx Brislington Map

© Britain-Visitor.com

Sunday, January 16, 2011

Bank Holidays in the UK

National holidays or public holidays are called Bank Holidays in Britain.

The UK has fewer public holidays than many other countries including Japan and India.

The main public (bank) holidays in the UK are:

January 1 - New Year's Day

Good Friday (late March or early April)

Easter Monday (late March or early April)

First Monday in May (May Day)

Last Monday in May

Last Monday in August

December 25 - Christmas Day

December 26 - Boxing Day

* If January 1 or December 25 or 26 falls on a Saturday or Sunday, the Monday becomes a holiday.

© Britain-Visitor.com

Saturday, January 15, 2011

Gwalia Stores

Gwalia Stores (aka 'The Gwalia') was founded in the early 1880s by businessman William Llewellyn and his wife Mary to serve the community of Ogmore Vale. The shop began as a grocery/bakery and later expanded to include ironmongery, drapery, and millinery. The Llewellyn family originally lived above the shop.


Gwalia Stores
The photograph below shows how Gwalia Stores would have looked during the 1920s. 'The Gwalia' remained open until 1973 and was later sold to the Museum of Welsh Life (aka St Fagans National History Museum) in 1988. 'The Gwalia' has been painstakingly reconstructed on its current site in the museum grounds.

Gwalia Stores
Visitors to the Museum of Welsh Life can visit the Gwalia Stores.

The Museum of Welsh Life (St Fagans: National History Museum) is located 4 miles west of Cardiff City Centre, just off the A4232. Visitors to the Museum of Welsh Life may also want to visit nearby Caerphilly Castle, Caerleon Fortress Baths, Caerleon Amphitheatre or Roman Legionary Museum Caerleon.

St Fagans National History Museum
Cardiff
CF5 6XB
Tel: 029 2057 3500

Museum of Welsh Life Map

© Britain-Visitor.com

Friday, January 14, 2011

Newquay Cornwall Airport Flight Information

Track flights to and from Newquay Cornwall Airport Flight Information (NQY).



Flight information is provided by FlightStats, and is subject to the FlightStats Terms of Use

Newquay Cornwall Airport Flight Information (NQY) is situated 4 and a half miles north of the centre of Newquay. The airport is convenient for Truro and The Eden Project and the Tate St Ives art gallery.

Newquay Cornwall Airport was formally a US air base.

The Western Greyhound Service #556 runs to the airport on the Padstow-Newquay-Padstow route. The bus takes about 20 minutes from both Padstow Old Rail Station and Newquay Bus Station.

Newquay Cornwall Airport (NQY) has connecting flights to Bristol Airport, Cardiff, Glasgow, Isles of Scilly, Leeds Bradford, London Gatwick, Manchester Airport, Newcastle and Plymouth and international flights to Cork and Dublin in Ireland as well as seasonal flights to Alicante in Spain with Ryanair and Dusseldorf in Germany with Lufthansa.

Most UK flights are operated by Air Southwest. The airport offes airport parking for over 500 cars. An Airport Development Fee of 5 GBP is currently levied on all departing passengers.

Newquay Cornwall Airport
St. Mawgan
Newquay
Cornwall
TR8 4RQ
UK
Tel: +44(0)1637 860600

© Britain-Visitor.com

Thursday, January 13, 2011

Oakdale Workmen's Institute

The Oakdale Workmen's Institute is a fine example of the workmen's institutes which were the centres of community life in Southern Wales valley towns. The institutes were centres for both entertainment and education, and they often housed libraries, reading rooms, cinemas, and theatres.

The institutes were paid for by the workers themselves. The Oakdale Workmen's Institute opened in 1917, and the institute operated until 1967 in the small mining community of Oakdale in Gwent.


Oakdale Workmen's Institute

The Oakdale Workmen's Institute was donated to the Museum of Welsh Life (aka St Fagans National History Museum) in 1989 and has been painstakingly reconstructed on its current site in the museum grounds.

Oakdale Workmen's Institute
The Museum of Welsh Life (St Fagans: National History Museum) is located 4 miles west of Cardiff City Centre, just off the A4232. Visitors to the Museum of Welsh Life may also want to visit nearby Caerphilly Castle, Caerleon Fortress Baths, Caerleon Amphitheatre or Roman Legionary Museum Caerleon.

St Fagans National History Museum
Cardiff
CF5 6XB
Tel: 029 2057 3500

Museum of Welsh Life Map

© Britain-Visitor.com

Wednesday, January 12, 2011

Perrier

The perrier like its cousin the trebuchet operated on the concept of counterpoint. The perrier, however, was powered by human muscle power rather than the heavy ballast used by the trebuchet. Counterpoise engines like the perrier were developed more than 5000 years ago in China, but their use spread to the west during the Crusader Wars of the 12th century AD.


Perrier
The perrier had the advantage of being much lighter and thus more easily transported than other stone throwing engines like the trebuchet. The perrier could hurl 5 kg projectiles over a range of 110 metres.

Perrier
The perrier seen above is a working reproduction which can be viewed by visitors to Caerphilly Castle.

Caerphilly Castle is located between the B4600 and B4623 in central Caerphilly in southern Wales just north of Cardiff. Visitors to Caerphilly Castle may also want to visit the nearby Caerleon Fortress Baths, Caerleon Amphitheatre or Roman Legionary Museum Caerleon.

Caerphilly
Cardiff
CF83 1JD

Tel: 029 2088 3143

© Britain-Visitor.com

Tuesday, January 11, 2011

The Old Wellington Inn Manchester

The Old Wellington Inn and Sinclair's Oyster Bar in Shambles Square, close to Manchester Cathedral, are historic venues in the city.

The Old Wellington Inn survived the Blitz in 1940 and the IRA bomb in 1996 to remain the only surviving Tudor building in the centre of Manchester.

The pub was moved to its present location in the 1970s to make way for the Arndale Centre development.


The two pubs share a large outdoor area with trestle tables, which always seem jam-packed, unless it's raining of course. Not everyone's cup of tea, as it can get a bit rowdy, but definitely worth a try if you are in the city. Pies are a speciality.


The Old Wellington Inn
4 Cathedral Gates
Manchester M3 1SW
Tel: 0161 830 1440
Hours: 10am-11pm

The Old Wellington Inn is near the Arndale Center, Urbis, the Wheel of Manchester and Manchester Cathedral in the city centre.

The nearest station is Victoria.

© Britain-Visitor.com

Monday, January 10, 2011

Museum of Welsh Life

The Museum of Welsh Life is also known as the St Fagans National History Museum. Open since 1948, the museum occupies the grounds of St Fagans Castle and gardens, a late 16th-century manor house donated to the people of Wales by the Earl of Plymouth.

Over the last fifty years, more than 40 buildings from different historical periods have been re-erected on the grounds of the museum including houses, a school, a farm, a church and a remarkable Workingmen's Institute.

Museum of Welsh Life

Visitors to the Museum of Welsh Life can view the farmhouse seen below. This farmhouse may have been painted red to protect it from evil spirits or as a sign of wealth.

Welsh farmers in the early 1800s became wealthy when food imports from Europe were stopped as a result of the Napoleonic wars.

Museum of Welsh Life

Visitors to the Museum of Welsh Life can step much further back in time (2000 years or so) when they view this replica Celtic village.

The round houses seen below are reproductions based on archaeological evidence uncovered in Wales. The houses contain reproductions of Celtic furniture and the surrounding land showcases agricultural methods of that period.

Museum of Welsh Life

The Museum of Welsh Life (St Fagans: National History Museum) is located 4 miles west of Cardiff City Centre, just off the A4232.

Visitors to the Museum of Welsh Life may also want to visit nearby Caerphilly Castle, Caerleon Fortress Baths, Caerleon Amphitheatre or Roman Legionary Museum Caerleon.

St Fagans National History Museum
Cardiff
CF5 6XB
Tel: 029 2057 3500

Museum of Welsh Life Map

© Britain-Visitor.com

Sunday, January 9, 2011

Trebuchet

The trebuchet (see below) was the largest and most famous of the seige engines of the middle ages. Trebuchets were very accurate and were used to breach castle walls and to destroy buildings within walled compounds.

Trebuchet
Trebuchets were operated by winching down the throwing arm and subsequently suspending a ballast. A missile was then loaded, and when the arm was released, that missile would be hurled at an intended target. The trebuchet could hurl 15 kg missiles 120 metres.

Trebuchet
The trebuchet seen above can be viewed by visitors to Caerphilly Castle.

Caerphilly Castle is located between the B4600 and B4623 in central Caerphilly in southern Wales just north of Cardiff. Visitors to Caerphilly Castle may also want to visit the nearby Caerleon Fortress Baths, Caerleon Amphitheatre or Roman Legionary Museum Caerleon.

Caerphilly
Cardiff
CF83 1JD

Tel: 029 2088 3143

Caerphilly Castle Map

© Britain-Visitor.com

Saturday, January 8, 2011

Welsh Love Spoons

Welsh Love Spoons range in size from this gigantic one in Caerleon, Wales (see below) to the size of a teaspoon. The carving of love spoons is a Welsh tradition and the earliest surviving example dates from around 1667. Traditionally, love spoons were given to women by their suitors. Certain symbols carved on the spoons conveyed meanings such as hearts for love, locks for security, and a number of caged balls depending on the number of children hoped for.


Welsh Love Spoons
Welsh Love Spoons are now sold at tourist spots all over Wales such as the selection below from Caerphilly Castle.

Welsh Love Spoons
Today, Welsh Love Spoons are given as wedding and anniversary gifts among other occasions. They are now viewed as a folk craft.

© Britain-Visitor.com

Friday, January 7, 2011

Mangonel

The mangonel is a seige weapon which dates from classical antiquity. The mangonel is a form of catapult which hurls stones or other missiles by means of a single arm propelled by torsion from a skein of twisted rope or sinew.


Mangonel

The mangonel (see below) was a relatively inefficient weapon because of its massive size and the smallish size of the missiles it could hurl. The mangonel weighed nearly 3 tons and could hurl 5 kg missiles 110 metres. The mangonel was probably used to hurl incendiary missiles rather than to attack castle walls.

Mangonel
The mangonel seen above is a working model which can be viewed by visitors to Caerphilly Castle.

Caerphilly Castle is located between the B4600 and B4623 in central Caerphilly in southern Wales just north of Cardiff. Visitors to Caerphilly Castle may also want to visit the nearby Caerleon Fortress Baths, Caerleon Amphitheatre or Roman Legionary Museum Caerleon.

Caerphilly
Cardiff
CF83 1JD

Tel: 029 2088 3143

Caerphilly Castle Map

© Britain-Visitor.com

Thursday, January 6, 2011

Haytor Dartmoor

Haytor (pictured below) on Dartmoor is one of the National Park's most visited spots.

Two and a half miles east of Widecombe, on the B3387, Haytor stands at 454m above sea level.


The granite outcrop has some fantastic views of the moor and on a clear day its's even possible to see the sea to the south.

Granite from the local quarries here was used to build the
British Museum, and the original London Bridge.

Map of Haytor

© Britain-Visitor.com

Wednesday, January 5, 2011

Ballista

The ballista is a giant crossbow which was developed by the ancient Greeks. The ballista's use continued into medieval times when it was found to be especially useful for defensive purposes and frequently mounted on towers or walls. The twin arms of the 'bow' were powered by torsion from skeins of twisted rope.


Ballista
The ballista (see below) could shoot 1.5 metre long darts a distance of 100 metres and was considered a highly effective anti-personnel weapon.

Ballista
The working replica of a ballista seen above can be viewed by visitors to Caerphilly Castle in Wales.

Caerphilly Castle is located between the B4600 and B4623 in central Caerphilly in southern Wales just north of Cardiff. Visitors to Caerphilly Castle may also want to visit the nearby Caerleon Fortress Baths, Caerleon Amphitheatre or Roman Legionary Museum Caerleon.

Caerphilly
CF83 1JD
Cardiff
Tel:029 2088 3143

Caerphilly Castle Map

© Britain-Visitor.com

Tuesday, January 4, 2011

Caerphilly Castle

Caerphilly Castle, unlike many other 13th-century Welsh castles, was not built by King Edward I in his effort to suppress the Welsh lords. Rather, Gilbert 'the Red' de Clare, a powerful Norman nobleman built it as a response to a dispute between himself and the Prince of Gwynedd, Llywelyn the Last. Construction began in 1268 AD but was not finished during de Clare's lifetime. Caerphilly Castle is the largest castle in Wales and the second largest in Britain after Windsor Castle.

Caerphilly Castle
Caerphilly Castle has a concentric design which provided for a multi-layered defense. In addition, water defenses were extensivley utilized. The castle was assaulted unsuccessfully in 1294-5 and 1316, but later captured for brief periods in 1403 and 1405.

Caerphilly Castle

In 1648, Cromwell's Parliamentary Army damaged Caerphilly Castle; this damage resulted in one of the castle's most prominent features, its leaning south-east tower (see below). The tower is 20 metres high but leans 3 metres out of the perpendicular. After several centuries of continued disuse and deterioration, Caerphilly Castle's owners since 1766, the Marquesses of Bute, began an extensive restoration. During the 1930s, streets around the castle were levelled to restore the dominant view the castle once commanded, and in 1950, the castle and grounds were handed over to the British government.

Caerphilly Castle

Visitors to Caerphilly Castle can view the Great Hall (see below) which has been remodeled and is licensed for use in wedding ceremonies.

Caerphilly Castle

Caerphilly Castle is located between the B4600 and B4623 in central Caerphilly in southern Wales just north of Cardiff. Visitors to Caerphilly Castle may also want to visit the nearby Caerleon Fortress Baths, Caerleon Amphitheatre or Roman Legionary Museum Caerleon.

Caerphilly
CF83 1JD
Cardiff
Tel:029 2088 3143

Caerphilly Castle Map

© Britain-Visitor.com